Sustainable Growth

Displaying items by tag: Sustainable growth

This policy brief aims to lay the ground for a just transition in South Africa’s metals value chain as it pertains to climate change only. It contributes to understanding: a) the nature of the impacts facing the value chain; b) the characteristics of the stakeholders at risks (namely workers, communities and small businesses); and c) the nature of the resilience plan which is required to ensure a just transition.

  • Year 2020
  • Author(s) Gaylor Montmasson-Clair (TIPS)
Published in Policy Briefs

Concrete is the most manufactured product on the planet. It is the second most consumed product after water.  Unfortunately, the manufacturing of Original Portland Cement (OPC), which accounts for 98% of global cement production, is highly energy intensive and involves a chemical process of converting limestone into clinker which releases massive quantities of CO2, and currently accounts for 8% of all global greenhouse gas emissions. If cement demand increases as expected, and the industry does not embark on a low-carbon pathway, it is possible that by 2050 cement production alone could account for almost one quarter of all global greenhouse gas emissions. This research report looks at the universe of possible solutions along the cement value chain to make the industry more climate compatible.

  • Year 2020
  • Organisation TIPS
  • Author(s) Sandy Lowitt (TIPS)
  • Countries and Regions South Africa
Published in Climate Change

Although many issues affect the water and sanitation sector, this Working Paper focuses on the access to those services. An in-depth assessment of the progress made in providing water and sanitation services can help inform various stakeholders and decision-makers about the need for renewed effort towards universal access. Against this backdrop, the objective is to meaningfully understand the extent of access and the quality of access to water and sanitation services at the household level in South Africa. 

To avoid a one step forward, two steps backwards scenario, which would erode gains already made, the situation demands renewed effort, coordination and collaboration by various stakeholders, supported by significant resources targeted towards the unserved as well as paying attention to those already served. It is imperative to focus on both the quantity and quality of access to water and sanitation services, as neglect of one will further reinforce the overall backlog. This is particularly relevant with the increasing need to prevent the outbreak of waterborne diseases and the spread of new and less known pathogens and diseases such as coronavirus disease (COVID-19). These demand well-functioning water and sanitation systems that allow proper washing of hands as well as cleaning of contaminated items and spaces. In this regard, embracing the systems and multidimensional view on access to water and sanitation will contribute to improved, appropriate, and sustainable access to water and sanitation services for all.

  • Year 2020
  • Organisation TIPS
  • Author(s) Shakespear Mudombi
  • Countries and Regions South Africa

The third Partnership for Action on the Green Economy (PAGE) Ministerial Conference was held in Cape Town in January 2019. The theme of the conference was Advancing Inclusive and Sustainable Economies. More than 500 leaders and innovators from the government, private and the civil society sectors from more than 50 countries met to discuss policy and strategy. The conference was hosted by the Department of Environmental Affairs of South Africa.

A number of concept papers were produced to inform the conference, including two by TIPS.

  • Green Economy Policies & Strategies Gaylor Montmasson-Clair (TIPS)
    This concept document assesses the state of play at each level of policymaking. It conducts a diagnostic of the situation at the four levels of the policy pyramid: the vision, plans and strategies,measures and instruments, and toolkits. It also has targeted recommendations.

  • Inclusivity within the Green Economy - Gaylor Montmasson-Clair and Shakespear Mudombi (TIPS)
    A gradular understanding of the structure and role of SMMEs in development and the green economy is needed to adequately harness their potential. This concept note aims to provide this analytical framework. It investigates the role of SMMEs in the economy and society, focuses on SMMEs within a green economy context, and considers the obstacles hindering thedevelopment of SMMEs. It then formulates the need and opportunity to reframe SMME development in alignment with sustainable development principles.

  • Sustainable Consumption and Production - Ntombifuthi Ntuli and Stanley Semelane (CSIR Energy Centre)
    This concept note takes stock of the status quo of sustainable consumption and production (SCP) implementation, particularly in the PAGE countries. It reviews the global perspective focusing on SCP application in various segments of the economy, followed by a review of the South African perspective of SCP implementation. It then looks at global best practise and at successful strategies from developed countries.

  • Green Finance - By Zenizeni Sustainable Finance
    An understanding of how to unlock the much-needed funding is central for green economy implementation was one of the central themes of the conference. This paper provided the context to inform the planning of the conference’s green finance sessions.
Published in All Projects

These three reports are part of a tri-partite initiative of the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), the Water Research Commission and TIPS on the development and growth of the water and sanitation industry in South Africa.

Global water and sanitation market dynamics: Implications for South Africa’s industrial development

From a trade and industry perspective, water and sanitation are intertwined with technology, and industrial and economic development. Water security and access to modern water and sanitation services rely on technology and industrial development, while industrial development, and more broadly, economic development, depend on water security and modern water and sanitation services. In South Africa, the water and sanitation sector has been identified by the country’s Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) as a potential driver of industrial development, notably through the emergence and growth of locally-designed and manufactured products and services. To inform the role that South African industries can play in the water and sanitation sector, this report focuses on providing a strategic outlook of global dynamics.

Links to other reports

Forward-looking approach to next generation sanitation and industrial development in South Africa

Desalination in South Africa: panacea or peril for industrial development?

  • Year 2018
  • Organisation TIPS; Water Research Commission; Department of Trade and Industry
  • Author(s) Gaylor Montmasson-Clair
  • Countries and Regions South Africa
Published in Sustainable Growth

These three reports are part of a tri-partite initiative of the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), the Water Research Commission and TIPS on the development and growth of the water and sanitation industry in South Africa.

Forward-looking approach to next generation sanitation and industrial development in South Africa

Conventional sanitation technologies have not really solved the challenges in the sanitation sector. As a result non-sewered, off-grid sanitation systems, commonly referred to as NGS, which differ greatly from conventional technologies, have been proposed as potentially better. NGS can be defined as an integrated system in which the frontend collects and conveys the specific input to the backend which fully treats the waste within the non-sewered sanitation system, to allow for safe reuse or disposal of the generated solid, liquid and gaseous output. South Africa is considering positioning itself as a leading manufacturer of NGS technologies. The country’s Industrial Policy Action Plan seeks to establish an NGS Cluster Development Programme. In line with this goal, this paper assesses the opportunities and constraints for NGS in the context of industrial development in South Africa.

Link to Policy Brief 

Forward-looking approach to next generation sanitation and industrial development in South Africa - A briefing

Links to other reports

Global water and sanitation market dynamics: Implications for South Africa’s industrial development

Desalination in South Africa: panacea or peril for industrial development?

  • Year 2018
  • Organisation TIPS; Water Research Commission; Department of Trade and Industry
  • Author(s) Shakespear Mudombi
  • Countries and Regions South Africa
Published in Sustainable Growth

These three reports are part of a tri-partite initiative of the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), the Water Research Commission and TIPS on the development and growth of the water and sanitation industry in South Africa.

Desalination in South Africa: panacea or peril for industrial development?

This paper examines two fundamental issues related to desalination. First, it examines whether desalination is appropriate for the South African context. This involves looking at how the technology is implemented, what the principal cost drivers are and the key trends in the technology. Then, it investigates the potential business model considerations that have to be borne in mind when thinking about adopting the technology for the country. Second, it investigates whether South Africa could play an active role in providing desalination solutions to global markets. This is congruent with supporting the local industry and identifying a role for industrial policy to play a part in advancing the industry. To see what policy measures are appropriate, both the local and foreign markets for desalination are analysed.

Links to other reports

Global water and sanitation market dynamics: Implications for South Africa’s industrial development

Forward-looking approach to next generation sanitation and industrial development in South Africa

 

  • Year 2018
  • Organisation TIPS; Water Research Commission; Department of Trade and Industry
  • Author(s) Muhammed Patel
  • Countries and Regions South Africa
Published in Sustainable Growth

A green economy industry and trade analysis: Assessing South Africa’s potential

A global transition to sustainable development is under way as a response to multiple environmental crises, including the widespread impacts of climate change. South Africa has embraced the shift to a green economy to attain inclusive, equitable and sustainable growth and development. The desire to transition to a green economy has been declared at the highest political level, and the articulation of the green economy agenda is evident in the South African policy framework.

From a trade and industry perspective, the transition materialises through two complementary streams: the development of new, green industries and the greening of existing, traditional industries. Within this framework, this report focuses on the development of new trade opportunities for green industries in South Africa both for import substitution and for exports. The main objectives are to identify and assess economic sectors that offer trade opportunities from the perspective of green industrial development; inform a subsequent sector-specific assessment of opportunities at the green industry and trade nexus; and provide recommendations for policymakers on how to further harness the identified opportunities in key sectors.

The report is published as part of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE) – an initiative by the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) in partnership with the South African Government (the Department of Environmental Affairs, the Department of Trade and Industry, the Department of Science and Technology, and the Economic Development Department).

The report was authored by TIPS, which led the research process, collected data, drafted the report, and managed stakeholder consultations. The research team comprised: Gaylor Montmasson-Clair (Senior Economist: Sustainable Growth), Christopher Wood (Economist), Shakespear Mudombi (Economist (Sustainable Growth) and Bhavna Deonarain (Researcher: sustainable Growth).

In addition to the Main Report, a four-page Overview is also available to download.

MEDIA

Let us dream of developing our productive capacity - Daily Maverick 21 June 2019 by Trudi Makhaya (Economic Adviser to President Cyril Ramaphosa)

 

                   

  • Year 2018
  • Organisation Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE)
  • Author(s) TIPS
  • Countries and Regions South Africa
Published in Green Economy

Session 2: Manufacturing and sustainable development: South African experiences

  • Year 2017
  • Organisation University of Cape Town
  • Author(s) Anthony Black; Stephanie Craig; Paul Dunne
  • Countries and Regions South Africa

Session 2: Manufacturing and sustainable development: South African experiences

  • Year 2017
  • Organisation GreenCape
  • Author(s) Sarah O’Carrol; Lauren Basson; Jarrod Lyons; Sam Smout; Henry Nuwarinda
  • Countries and Regions South Africa

Session 4 SustainableGrowth

 

  • Year 2016
  • Organisation Rhodes University
  • Author(s) David Fryer and Serge Hadisi
  • Countries and Regions South Africa

Session 4: Sustainable Growth 

  • Year 2016
  • Organisation WWF; TIPS
  • Author(s) Ellen Davies; Georgina Ryan; Gaylor Montmasson-Clair; Manisha Gulati
  • Countries and Regions South Africa

Session 4: Sustainable Growth

  • Year 2016
  • Organisation UNU-MERIT
  • Author(s) Dr Michiko Iizuka; Fernando Vargas; Jakob Baumann
  • Countries and Regions Latin America